Encryption

Greetings. This basic landing page provides access to Bradford Benn’s PGP key.

I have been aware of Public-Key Cryptography since the early 1990’s using PGP or Pretty Good Privacy for sensitive business e-mails. The idea is that it takes two keys to unlock a message, I create both. One that is private and one that is public. I distribute the public key to people I want to communicate securely with. People encrypt items to me using the public key, however I am the only one who can decrypt it. It also works in reverse, people can send me their public key and I can encrypt messages to them. The reason this can be powerful is that not only is the message encrypted, it also allows the users to verify the sender of the e-mail.

That is the important part for me, and the reason I am encouraging more people to encrypt their mail. It is not just for securing the contents, it is also for knowing that the sender truly is who they say they are. Think about how much that would cut down on phishing and other fraudulent e-mail scams. If I could verify that the sender was who they say their are.

I am using GPGTools as it integrates in my environment very easily as PGP has taken some interesting twists since I started using it. I simply installed the suite and voila it was functioning. I am also in the process of doing the same thing for files as well. The encryption on the files is as much to verify that it came from me, as it is to protect the files when I store them in the “cloud”. So if you get an e-mail from me, don’t be surprised if it is signed. My public key identifier is C93A52C6. You can download my public key from https://www.bradfordbenn.com/BradfordBenn-C93A52C6.asc. It was created July 23, 2014, it is scheduled to expire July 23, 2018.