Usage Rights

I am a firm believer that Information should be free. It does not always mean that it wants to be free, as Cory Doctrow discussed in his book Information Doesn’t Want to Be Free.

One goal of Creative Commons is to increase the amount of openly licensed creativity in “the commons” — the body of work freely available for legal use, sharing, repurposing, and remixing. Through the use of CC licenses, millions of people around the world have made their photos, videos, writing, music, and other creative content available for any member of the public to use.

Visit their website for more information and think about making a donation to support them.

Bradford’s Rules for Usage

After giving it some careful thought, I decided to make my site a Creative Commons Share and Share Alike site, this includes my public photo galleries. Rather than try to recreate the explanation of what this license grants people, I quote from the page Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International located at this link.

You are free to:

  • Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format
  • Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material
  • The licensor (Bradford) cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Under the following terms:

  • Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
  • NonCommercial — You may not use the material for commercial purposes.
  • ShareAlike — If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you must distribute your contributions under the same license as the original.
  • No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.

Notices:

  • You do not have to comply with the license for elements of the material in the public domain or where your use is permitted by an applicable exception or limitation.
  • No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material.